ZIMBABWE

Information about travelling to Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe is located in Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia

Facts about Zimbabwe
Population11,350,111 note: es
CapitalHarare
Time zoneUTC+2 (7 hours ahead of Washington, DC during Standard Time)
Location Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia

General info about Zimbabwe
The UK annexed Southern Rhodesia from the [British] South Africa Company in 1923. A 1961 constitution was formulated that favored whites in power. In 1965 the government unilaterally declared its independence, but the UK did not recognize the act and demanded more complete voting rights for the black African majority in the country (then called Rhodesia). UN sanctions and a guerrilla uprising finally led to free elections in 1979 and independence (as Zimbabwe) in 1980. Robert MUGABE, the nation's first prime minister, has been the country's only ruler (as president since 1987) and has dominated the country's political system since independence. His chaotic land redistribution campaign, which began in 2000, caused an exodus of white farmers, crippled the economy, and ushered in widespread shortages of basic commodities. Ignoring international condemnation, MUGABE rigged the 2002 presidential election to ensure his reelection. The ruling ZANU-PF party used fraud and intimidation to win a two-thirds majority in the March 2005 parliamentary election, allowing it to amend the constitution at will and recreate the Senate, which had been abolished in the late 1980s. In April 2005, Harare embarked on Operation Restore Order, ostensibly an urban rationalization program, which resulted in the destruction of the homes or businesses of 700,000 mostly poor supporters of the opposition. President MUGABE in June 2007 instituted price controls on all basic commodities causing panic buying and leaving store shelves empty for months. General elections held in March 2008 contained irregularities but still amounted to a censure of the ZANU-PF-led government with significant gains in opposition seats in parliament. MDC opposition leader Morgan TSVANGIRAI won the presidential polls, and may have won an out right majority, but official results posted by the Zimbabwe Electoral Committee did not reflect this. In the lead up to a run-off election in late June 2008, considerable violence enacted against opposition party members led to the withdrawal of TSVANGIRAI from the ballot. Extensive evidence of vote tampering and ballot-box stuffing resulted in international condemnation of the process. Negotiations over a power sharing agreement, allowing MUGABE to remain as president and creating the new position of prime minister for TSVANGIRAI, have fallen apart over the division of cabinet posts, governorships, and reform of the national security apparatus.
Disease threats
degree of risk: high food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis
Languages spoken
English (official), Shona, Sindebele (the language of the Ndebele, sometimes called Ndebele), numerous but minor tribal dialects
What about drugs?
transit point for cannabis and South Asian heroin, mandrax, and methamphetamines en route to South Africa
Ethnic division
African 98% (Shona 82%, Ndebele 14%, other 2%), mixed and Asian 1%, white less than 1%
HIV/AIDS prevalence rate
24.6% (2001 est.)
Climate
tropical; moderated by altitude; rainy season (November to March)
Resources
coal, chromium ore, asbestos, gold, nickel, copper, iron ore, vanadium, lithium, tin, platinum group metals
Economy
The government of Zimbabwe faces a wide variety of difficult economic problems as it struggles with an unsustainable fiscal deficit, an overvalued official exchange rate, hyperinflation, and bare store shelves. Its 1998-2002 involvement in the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo drained hundreds of millions of dollars from the economy. The government's land reform program, characterized by chaos and violence, has badly damaged the commercial farming sector, the traditional source of exports and foreign exchange and the provider of 400,000 jobs, turning Zimbabwe into a net importer of food products. The EU and the US provide food aid on humanitarian grounds. Badly needed support from the IMF has been suspended because of the government's arrears on past loans and the government's unwillingness to enact reforms that would stabilize the economy. The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe routinely prints money to fund the budget deficit, causing the official annual inflation rate to rise from 32% in 1998, to 133% in 2004, 585% in 2005, passed 1000% in 2006, and 26000% in November 2007, and to 11.2 million percent in 2008. Meanwhile, the official exchange rate fell from approximately 1 (revalued) Zimbabwean dollar per US dollar in 2003 to 30,000 per US dollar in September 2007.
Environment
deforestation; soil erosion; land degradation; air and water pollution; the black rhinoceros herd - once the largest concentration of the species in the world - has been significantly reduced by poaching; poor mining practices have led to toxic waste and heavy metal pollution

Cities in Zimbabwe

beitbridge     bindura     bulawayo     chegutu     chinhoyi     chipinge     chiredzi     chitungwiza     gwanda     gweru     harare     hwange     kadoma     kariba     karoi     kwekwe     marondera     masvingo     mount darwin     mutare     mutoko     mvuma     norton     redcliffe     rusape     shurugwi     victoria falls     zvishavane    

National airlines
Air Zimbabwe -Zimbabwe.airline website


Airports in Zimbabwe
Buffalo RangeBFO
BulawayoBUQ
Bumi HillsBZH
ChipingeCHJ
GweruGWE
HarareHRE
KaribaKAB
MasvingoMVZ
MutareUTA
Victoria FallsVFA
HwangeWKI


Beer in Zimbabwe (0.33l)
Harare~ 0.9 EUR
HARARE~ 0.9 EUR
Harare~ 0.9 EUR

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