ANGOLA

Information about travelling to Angola

Angola is located in Southern Africa, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean, between Namibia and Democratic Republic of the Congo

Facts about Angola
Population12,531,357 (July 2008 est
CapitalLuanda
Time zoneUTC+1 (6 hours ahead of Washington, DC during Standard Time)
Location Southern Africa, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean, between Namibia and Democratic Republic of the Congo

General info about Angola
Angola is rebuilding its country after the end of a 27-year civil war in 2002. Fighting between the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), led by Jose Eduardo DOS SANTOS, and the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), led by Jonas SAVIMBI, followed independence from Portugal in 1975. Peace seemed imminent in 1992 when Angola held national elections, but fighting picked up again by 1996. Up to 1.5 million lives may have been lost - and 4 million people displaced - in the quarter century of fighting. SAVIMBI's death in 2002 ended UNITA's insurgency and strengthened the MPLA's hold on power. President DOS SANTOS held legislative elections in September 2008, and announced plans to hold presidential elections in 2009.
Disease threats
degree of risk: very high food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepat
Languages spoken
Portuguese (official), Bantu and other African languages
What about drugs?
used as a transshipment point for cocaine destined for Western Europe and other African states, particularly South Africa
Ethnic division
Ovimbundu 37%, Kimbundu 25%, Bakongo 13%, mestico (mixed European and native African) 2%, European 1%, other 22%
HIV/AIDS prevalence rate
3.9% (2003 est.)
Climate
semiarid in south and along coast to Luanda; north has cool, dry season (May to October) and hot, rainy season (November to April)
Resources
petroleum, diamonds, iron ore, phosphates, copper, feldspar, gold, bauxite, uranium
Economy
Angola's high growth rate is driven by its oil sector, which has taken advantage of high international oil prices. Oil production and its supporting activities contribute about 85% of GDP. Increased oil production supported growth averaging more than 15% per year from 2004 to 2007. A postwar reconstruction boom and resettlement of displaced persons has led to high rates of growth in construction and agriculture as well. Much of the country's infrastructure is still damaged or undeveloped from the 27-year-long civil war. Remnants of the conflict such as widespread land mines still mar the countryside even though an apparently durable peace was established after the death of rebel leader Jonas SAVIMBI in February 2002. Subsistence agriculture provides the main livelihood for most of the people, but half of the country's food must still be imported. In 2005, the government started using a $2 billion line of credit, since increased to $7 billion, from China to rebuild Angola's public infrastructure, and several large-scale projects were completed in 2006. Angola also has large credit lines from Brazil, Portugal, Germany, Spain, and the EU. The central bank in 2003 implemented an exchange rate stabilization program using foreign exchange reserves to buy kwanzas out of circulation. This policy became more sustainable in 2005 because of strong oil export earnings; it has significantly reduced inflation. Although consumer inflation declined from 325% in 2000 to under 13% in 2008, the stabilization policy has put pressure on international net liquidity. Angola became a member of OPEC in late 2006 and in late 2007 was assigned a production quota of 1.9 million barrels a day, somewhat less than the 2-2.5 million bbl Angola's government had wanted. To fully take advantage of its rich national resources - gold, diamonds, extensive forests, Atlantic fisheries, and large oil deposits - Angola will need to implement government reforms, increase transparency, and reduce corruption. The government has rejected a formal IMF monitored program, although it continues Article IV consultations and ad hoc cooperation. Corruption, especially in the extractive sectors, and the negative effects of large inflows of foreign exchange, are major challenges facing Angola.
Environment
overuse of pastures and subsequent soil erosion attributable to population pressures; desertification; deforestation of tropical rain forest, in response to both international demand for tropical timber and to domestic use as fuel, resulting in loss of biodiversity; soil erosion contributing to water pollution and siltation of rivers and dams; inadequate supplies of potable water

Cities in Angola

benguela     caala     cabinda     caconda     caluquembe     camabatela     camacupa     catabola     catumbela     caxito     cazaje     chissamba     huambo     kibala     kuito     leua     lobito     longonjo     luanda     luau     lubango     lucapa     luena     lumeje     malanje     menongue     namibe     ondjiva     saurimo     soyo     sumbe     uige    


Airports in Angola
AnduloANL
AmbrizAZZ
Gen. V. DeslandesBUG
CabindaCAB
CazomboCAV
CatumbelaCBT
CangambaCNZ
Cuito CuanavaleCTI
DiricoDRC
DundoDUE
LumbalaGGC
NegageGXG
JambaJMB
CapandaKNP
4 de FevereiroLAD
LukapaLBZ
LuenaLUO
MalangeMEG
NamibeMSZ
SumbeNDD
HuamboNOV
Porto AmboimPBN
ChitatoPGI
LubangoSDD
MenongueSPP
KuitoSVP
SoyoSZA
LuauUAL
UigeUGO
SaurimoVHC
OngivaVPE
XangongoXGN


Beer in Angola (0.33l)
Luanda~ 1 EUR

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